Menu
Search
Countdown 1200 x 500
Expanded Footprint, Connected Campus
The show is expanding the 2020 footprint to include the Las Vegas Festival Grounds, located on the Las Vegas Strip adjacent to the Circus Circus Hotel. Types of exhibits in the Festival Grounds will include aerial and cranes, earth moving, hauling and underground construction.

The 2020 show connected campus will also include new and expanded transportation, attendee experiences and registration locations. Features will include multi-site drop off locations for shuttles, complimentary monorail passes, golf cart shuttles, and various experiential transportation options to accommodate for the attendees throughout the week.

“AEM is committed to bringing people together at CONEXPO-CON/AGG, as the show serves as a catalyst for industry growth and development,” said Dana Wuesthoff, vice president of exhibitions and event services at AEM and CONEXPO-CON/AGG show director.  “We wanted to make sure everyone can explore the entire show and have the best possible experience.”

Key insider’s tip: Create a plan for each day so you’ll be sure to see the exhibitors and products you want to connect with, but also be on the lookout for ones you’ve never heard of!
CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE make it easy to prepare with an interactive online exhibitor directory and a show mobile app that will continuously synch to your online customizable show planner.
All about the Co-located IFPE

IFPE 2020 provides the forum for engineers to develop the solutions that drive the equipment of tomorrow. 

“There’s simply no better place for engineers to find new ideas, make new connections and – most importantly – discover new solutions,” said IFPE Show Director, John Rozum. 

Construction industry trade shows are often seen as prime opportunities to see the latest and greatest equipment set to go to market – cranes, excavators, trucks and much, much more. But what’s often overlooked is all of the innovative achievements of the engineers tasked with making that equipment stronger, faster, more efficient and easier to operate.

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers – along with the National Fluid Power Association – is proud to bring together a unique combination of engineers and executives at IFPE 2020 – both in booths, and in aisles – to share ideas, educate one another, and ultimately shape the future of the construction industry through collaboration and consensus.

There’s really no show quite like IFPE. It sits on the second floor of South Hall, surrounded by CONEXPO-CON/AGG, the largest construction equipment expo in the Western Hemisphere. 
But unlike its co-located trade show counterpart, IFPE brings products and technology well beyond the needs of the OEMs who manufacture the offerings seen at CONEXPO-CON/AGG. 

The products on display span all sectors of the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries. Engineers designing equipment for construction, agriculture, aerospace, automotive, – even amusement parks – come to IFPE.  

For example, the same company that may be looking for hydrostatic drives for a new loader might also be looking for hydraulic or pneumatic factory automation solutions for the manufacturing line where that loader will be built.

Part of the IFPE show experience for many attendees includes participation in IFPE’s education program, including college courses and timely sessions to help them stay on top of their game. 
IFPE Education – Focused on Fluid Power

The IFPE College Courses emphasize hands-on technical knowledge on the effective use of hydraulics in mobile equipment. Content includes Fundamentals of Hydraulic Systems; Electro Hydrostatic Actuation; Safety Hydraulics, Best Practices for Modern Machinery; Hydraulics in the Digital Age: Hydraulic Fluid Properties, Efficiency and Contamination Control; and Digital Design.

The IFPE Research Symposium is hosted by IFPE co-owner National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) and runs during lunch (11:30 am -12:30 pm) March 11-13. Sessions will showcase the latest fluid power research at U.S. universities being funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve energy efficiency of off-road vehicle hydraulic systems.

“We focused on developing education programs that offer attendees the latest ideas and innovations in fluid power technology, applications and research. Our classes and sessions deliver critical information for engineers and others involved in the design and manufacturing process,” said Eric Lanke, president/CEO, NFPA. 

IFPE 2020 education includes:
Additive Manufacturing - Vince Anewenter, Milwaukee School of Engineering
Industry of the Future - Prasad Ganorkar, McKinsey & Company
IoT – Sharing Data Across Customer Boundaries - Adam Livesay, Elevat
Mobile Hydraulic Robotics - Autonomous Machines - Chris Woodard and John O’Neill, Danfoss
Workforce Development - Lynn Beyer, NFPA

Presenters for IFPE’s education sessions come from distinguished Universities and organizations like MSOE, Purdue University, Parker Hannifin, Danfoss and many more.

New for the 2020 show is the opportunity to mix and match IFPE sessions with those offered through CONEXPO-CON/AGG, giving attendees an even greater value for their education dollar. 
To add to the great education sessions, and the over 400 exhibitors, in 2020 IFPE will be hosting - for the very first time - a special networking reception for engineers and executives - right on the show floor. 

IFPE Networking Reception
IFPE’s Fluid Power Hour, presented by Bosch Rexroth, will be held on March 11th from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on the IFPE show floor. The event includes a bonus hour on the IFPE show floor, complimentary hors ‘d oeuvres and cocktails and entertainment.

“AEM and the National Fluid Power Association are proud to bring together a unique combination of engineers and executives at IFPE 2020, both in booths and in aisles, to share ideas, educate one another, and ultimately shape the future of the construction industry through collaboration and consensus,” said John Rozum, director, ag events at AEM and IFPE show director. “There’s simply no better place for engineers to find new ideas, new people and new solutions to significant organizational challenges than a trade show floor. 

“We encourage all exhibitors to bring their top engineers and executives to take advantage of a great networking experience and interact with industry peers,” said Rozum.

Event sponsors include Comer Industries, DANA, Danfoss, Eaton, Nachi, Ha-vey, Poclain and Sun Hydraulics.

What is new and different at CONEXPO 2020? 
Let’s start with one of the most noticeable changes - the gold lot is under construction. So what will we do with the exhibitors who were once in that space?  

CONEXPO-CON/AGG is expanding the 2020 show footprint to include the Las Vegas Festival Grounds, located on the Las Vegas Strip adjacent to the Circus Circus Hotel. We know this will be a huge show with  a lot to see and do. 

Our connected campus will include new and expanded transportation options including additional buses to help get you to/from the show, and more options to get you around the show with golf carts and pedicabs. We are also offering more food outlets and other creature comforts to help enhance the attendee experience. 

Types of exhibits in the Festival Grounds will include aerial and cranes including NCCCO’s Lift Safety Zone, earth moving, hauling and underground construction. 

Exhibitors in the Festival Grounds include brands like Caterpillar, JLG Industries, Manitou North America and Volvo Construction Equipment North America. 

It’s not enough to simply survive in the industry today. The goal should be to thrive. 

And in order to do so, industry professionals need to step outside their comfort zones, embrace an open-minded attitude toward all of the ways disruptive technologies are impacting the world today, and learn how to leverage the latest and greatest industry trends to positively impact their bottom lines. 
“It’s that third and final aspect that’s on everyone’s mind today,” said Dana Wuesthoff, vice president of exhibitions and event services and CONEXPO-CON/AGG show director. “What is the return on investment (ROI) of these trends and technologies? What can they offer to help employees do their job better? 

“A trade show like CONEXPO-CON/AGG can help answer those questions – and more. What the show serves to do is offer industry professionals a forum for seeing new trends and innovations, help them determine the value proposition, bring that information back to their organizations, and inspire them to act on what they learned,” continued Wuesthoff.  

AEM is committed to bringing people together at CONEXPO-CON/AGG, because the show serves as a catalyst for industry growth and development. It allows the association to have a hand in helping companies drive their business forward and develop a sound knowledge for what tomorrow may bring.
In addition to the 2800 exhibiting companies and the 2.6 million square feet of exhibit space there are also 180 education sessions.

Take Charge of the Future

Education at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020
Education is always a vital component of both CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE to help attendees not only survive, but thrive in a changing and global industry.

Attendees at the 2020 shows can take advantage of more than 180 education sessions packed with timely and actionable information, developed with the guidance of leading industry groups, and delivered by industry experts. 

New for 2020 are mix-and-match sessions between CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE for company teams to cost-effectively obtain learning sessions targeted to their needs.

“The line-up of programming is not only larger than it has ever been but includes a fresh line-up of speakers stacked side-by-side with core programming that is always highly attended,” said Eileen Dickson, vice president education, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association and CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education Committee chair.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education features 10 tracks covering a variety of equipment applications, site development, fleet management, business best practices, technology, safety, and attracting and retaining talent. IFPE education is grouped in two tracks: Hydraulics & Pneumatics at Work and The Business of Fluid Power. Its popular College Courses return, and new is an IFPE Research Symposium.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education – Targeting the Construction Industries
CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education tracks will offer the latest trends and best practices focused on: aggregates; asphalt; concrete; cranes, rigging & aerial lifts; earthmoving & site development; equipment management & maintenance; business management; and safety, plus technology solutions and attracting, engaging and retaining talent.

“The education committee took great care in putting together a program that grows attendee knowledge on building their business on all fronts, whether the technical skills needed in the field or best practices to build their business,” said Graham Brent, CEO of the NCCCO Foundation and CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education Committee vice chair.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education includes:
Driving New Innovation at Complacent Companies - James Benham , JB Knowledge
Drones on Construction Sites for All Contractors - Ryan Murguia/Zach Pieper, Quantum Land Design
Gain a Competitive Advantage Through Construction Technology - Tauhira Hoossainy, Milwaukee Tool
How to Win the War for Talent - Gregg Schoppman, FMI
Safety Training Ninja - Regina McMichael, The Learning Factory, Inc.
Technology Trends: Lessons Learned - Helga Jacobsen, United Rentals
Top 10 Reasons Why Construction Businesses Fail - Larry Kokklenberg, Center for Business Development

These sessions feature the latest topics and industry trends and are grouped into 10 tracks for ease in finding education that meets your needs. 

One of those sessions will be “Drones on Construction Sites for All Contractors” on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG. 

From machine control to drone survey data, material takeoffs to volumetric calculations and progress reporting, site prep contractors have many ways they can incorporate new technologies into their workflow, but misconceptions are holding some contractors back. 

We spoke with Ryan Murguia, president and Zach Pieper, operations manager of Quantum Land Design, based in Sperry, Iowa, to get the facts. Quantum Land Design specializes in managing and preparing site data required for including 3D machine control, drone data and takeoffs of any scale.
Murguia and Pieper not only understand technology, but have previously worked in construction, so they know what contractors need to get done. “We help contractors figure out how each piece of the technology puzzle can fit into their operation,” says Murguia. “We can demonstrate different technology use cases they might not have considered."


Here are the five biggest misconceptions about technology for site prep contractors:

1. It’s going to be difficult and expensive to collect data from a drone.

“There’s a misconception that you need an expensive drone, someone that is highly trained, special survey equipment or a costly web service contract to process data,” says Murguia.  Instead, Murguia says that most of the equipment needed is already in place on the jobsite. The reality is that most contractors already have machine control and a GPS rover set up on the site. “If you have that equipment, it’s pretty straight forward to add a drone to help you collect topographic data.” Pieper says he can teach someone in two to four hours how to get the data they need from a drone flight.

2. Old ways of measuring earthmoving are more reliable. 


Site prep contractors are paid based on the amount of dirt moved, and historically those numbers have not been calculated, but estimated based on the truck count and the average amount in a truckload. According to Murguia, those estimates might be 20-50 percent off the actual amount of dirt moved. Drone data is a game changer because it can capture accurate cut volumes based on millions of data points in minutes. Clients are assured of more accurate billing and costly disputes are avoided.
Murguia says an engineer working on a hydraulic dam project didn’t trust the data captured from drones, so he also used traditional surveying methods and compared them to the data from three flights. “We were within four percent of the volume numbers and they trusted our numbers based on drone data more,” said Murguia. 

3. We need large jobs to make effective use of drones and machine control.

Another misconception is that machine control only makes sense for large jobs. “You can use it just for digging a basement,” says Murguia.  In one use case Quantum Land Design used drone data to create a machine control file to address drainage issues on a new construction home site. With the expansion of machine control to excavators, the number of jobs using machine control is growing rapidly.

4. Our firm can’t afford to outsource.

While Pieper and Murguia recommend contractors capture their own data, they also believe that for most companies, it makes sense to outsource managing and manipulating the data.  “The learning curve is really in the office,” says Pieper.  Hardware and software is a big expense.  Outsourcing makes the technology accessible to small firms that may not have the resources for an estimating department or data analysis. “The immediate value comes from making sure you get paid accurately for the work completed.”

 5. I can only use drone data for measuring stockpiles.

Pieper says contractors have tendency to purchase a drone for a particular task such as measuring stockpiles, and then use it only for that one task. “There’s so much more you can do with them that is valuable,” says Pieper.  In one use case a customer saw some extraordinary results.

A quarry customer was having trouble with failing transmissions on their haul trucks.  An analysis of the quarry survey data captured by the drone revealed steeper slopes than was specified for the haul trucks.  After the haul road was redesigned to the proper specs, the company saved over $300,000 in fuel and maintenance costs in one year.  “It took just four days, from drone flight to delivering the machine control model with the new haul road, they were able to see the benefits immediately,” said Pieper. “A traditional survey, design, and construction staking process would have taken weeks, and been far more dangerous in this situation.”

If you want to learn how to tie together all the construction technologies for earthmoving into your workflow, check out the session by Murguia and Pieper. 

The Real Reason Construction Companies Fail 
Another must-see session at CONEXPO=-CON/AGG will be the Real Reason Construction Companies Fail, presented by Larry Kokklenberg, PhD. Larry is a principal in Organizational Trainers & Consultants, a dynamic consultancy serving both the public and private sectors.

According to Larry, The Small Business Administration (SBA) identifies a huge failure rate among start-up companies:
Roughly 20 percent fail in the first year
Roughly 50 percent fail within five years
Roughly 66 percent fail within 10 years

Construction companies have an even uglier track record. Roughly two-thirds go out of business within five years. The owners of those failed companies tend to point fingers at external factors such as insurance, taxes, politics, an inability to get enough workers, etc. But those factors aren’t really the cause of company failures, which is why the competitors down the street seem to be handling them just fine.

In reality, the real causes of construction company failure are within the control of the company owner. That doesn’t mean these causes are always easy to fix. It takes planning, discipline and hard work. But nonetheless, they are controllable.

In working with construction companies for many years, Larry has assembled a long list of reasons for failure. He will be getting into the fine details of all of them when he speaks at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020. Until then, here are a few of the more consequential.

1. Starting the business for the wrong reasons. 

Many companies don’t start out with a strategic business plan. The owner simply wants to be his or her own boss. Sometimes a friend says, “Let’s start our own company and make a lot of money.” The problem is that nobody gets rich quick in the construction industry. There are only two entities that are in the business of making money: the Department of Treasury and counterfeiters. Construction companies are in the business of serving customers.

Starting a construction company should be based on a legitimate opportunity, i.e. little competition in a growing market area. The owner should also have a clear vision for what he or she wants to the company to be, along with a roadmap toward profitability. Having a strategic roadmap will also help new companies avoid another common cause of failure: trying to grow and diversify too quickly.

2. Poor company culture. 

Nobody wants to go to work in a war zone. When that’s the type of culture that exists, people just put in the bare minimum. This culture often leads to higher employee turnover, sloppy work, higher workman’s comp claims, and financial losses. The unfortunate truth is that many construction companies do not have a great culture. Leadership must identify what employees want, what the company wants, and how to get there. It takes commitment and time, but it can be done.

3. Poor hiring. 

There’s a saying I like: “When you just hire a pair of hands, you never get a head.” For long-term success, companies must hire people with the desire and ability to grow with the company and help lead. Warm bodies aren’t enough. This can be harder to do when hiring out of a union hall. But even in that circumstance, it’s probably better to pay any show-up costs and ask for a more qualified employee. That’s far less costly than carrying an employee who continues to perform substandard work or has a bad attitude.

4. Poor financial systems. 

This is a big bullet point under the broader topic of capital and financial management. Many construction companies can’t track if they’re making or losing money until the very end of the year. I’ve even seen companies that fail to bill for all or their work because they are so busy completing projects and doing estimates for new projects. Good financial systems are an absolute must so those types of things do not happen. Accounting software can help, but won’t solve everything. A good accountant or in-house financial manager may be advisable —one that will provide detailed accounting at least every few months.

 5. Inefficient operations. 

Inefficiency rarely happens in big, easily identifiable chunks. Inefficiency typically impacts that company in 10- or 20-minute increments. A good example is a seven-person crew standing around on a jobsite waiting for a truck to show up. Over the course of the year, this type of wasted time can add up to the point that all profitability is sacrificed.

6. Poor customer service. 

A lot of companies do not listen to their customers very well. Companies just focus on completing the work according to the contract. If they get paid, they assume all is good. But remember, construction companies are in the business of serving customers, and that includes good customer service.

7. Family-run corporations. 

These businesses have an even higher failure rate than the typical company. Family-run businesses have a unique set of challenges that generally hurt future generations more than the current generation. This is a complex issue with many facets to consider. 

5 Ways to Shake Up Your Safety Training

Another speaker who should be on your must-see list is Regina McMichael. 

At 20-years old, Regina’s husband died after falling off a roof at a jobsite where he was working. That was the day her safety career started. Thirty-three years later she is still laser-focused on making the industry safer by improving the way we teach safety training. Her energy, humor, and engaging style as a speaker and trainer has earned her rave reviews throughout the industry. She recently shared five key ways to change your safety training to make it more effective.

1. Identify What the Learners Know and What They Need to Know

 “The gap between these two areas is what you teach to,” says McMichael. “Nothing more, nothing less.” She teaches trainers to use the ADDIE Model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) to first analyze and then design training.  “We need to respect our audience and not waste time teaching them things they don’t need to know, like the 29 CFR 19….– they don’t need to know that to be safe,” she says.

2. Make Training Interactive

It’s time to put away those deadly PowerPoint presentations. McMichael recommends engaging workers with problem-solving activities. “Give them a scenario and ask how would you fix this? It will be much more interesting and fun,” she says. “Have the workers help develop the solutions and train themselves.” Use case studies, group discussion and competition to gain their interest and attention. “Friendly competition makes classes fun and makes things stick,” she says.

3. Use Multiple Avenues to Train Workers

In construction there are a huge number of small firms without someone in a dedicated safety role. Those tasked with safety training are frequently overworked and can find themselves in a position of having to teach a topic they don’t have any expertise in.  McMichael advises firms to use multiple training tools, such as local classes, online training, in-person training, and one-on-one jobsite training with supervisors to help lessen the burden on those in the safety-training role. “There is no one magic solution,” she explains.

4. Bring Humanity Back to Safety

“If we’re going to be successful, safety training cannot be about compliance,” says McMichael. “We have to let human beings know we care about them and let them know we want them to stay alive.” Jobsite pressures can often result in workers not taking the time to be safe. Employers need to show they value workers by providing them with the knowledge and best practices to ensure they go home to their families.

5. Support Your Trainers

McMichael believes a commitment to safety and effective training will enable companies to move from compliance-driven checklists to humanity-based solutions. One of McMichael’s classes, Getting a Seat at the C-Suite: What Every Safety Pro Should Know, focuses on how to get management to support safety initiatives. Another, titled Safety Training Ninjas, based on her recently released book, “The Safety Training Ninja” equips trainers with a process to develop effective training, and tools to make it valuable and something people want to learn. Trainers also learn how to develop learning objectives and demonstrate objectives were achieved. People not Policy, is about bringing humanity back to the safety world. All three programs will be offered at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020. 

"Safety Training Ninja" will be presented on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG.

For free safety training resources and information about McMichael visit www.safetytrainingninja.com

The show is expanding the 2020 footprint to include the Las Vegas Festival Grounds, located on the Las Vegas Strip adjacent to the Circus Circus Hotel. Types of exhibits in the Festival Grounds will include aerial and cranes, earth moving, hauling and underground construction.

The 2020 show connected campus will also include new and expanded transportation, attendee experiences and registration locations. Features will include multi-site drop off locations for shuttles, complimentary monorail passes, golf cart shuttles, and various experiential transportation options to accommodate for the attendees throughout the week.

“AEM is committed to bringing people together at CONEXPO-CON/AGG, as the show serves as a catalyst for industry growth and development,” said Dana Wuesthoff, vice president of exhibitions and event services at AEM and CONEXPO-CON/AGG show director.  “We wanted to make sure everyone can explore the entire show and have the best possible experience.”

Key insider’s tip: Create a plan for each day so you’ll be sure to see the exhibitors and products you want to connect with, but also be on the lookout for ones you’ve never heard of!

CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE make it easy to prepare with an interactive online exhibitor directory and a show mobile app that will continuously synch to your online customizable show planner.
All about the Co-located IFPE

IFPE 2020 provides the forum for engineers to develop the solutions that drive the equipment of tomorrow. 

“There’s simply no better place for engineers to find new ideas, make new connections and – most importantly – discover new solutions,” said IFPE Show Director, John Rozum. 

Construction industry trade shows are often seen as prime opportunities to see the latest and greatest equipment set to go to market – cranes, excavators, trucks and much, much more. But what’s often overlooked is all of the innovative achievements of the engineers tasked with making that equipment stronger, faster, more efficient and easier to operate.

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers – along with the National Fluid Power Association – is proud to bring together a unique combination of engineers and executives at IFPE 2020 – both in booths, and in aisles – to share ideas, educate one another, and ultimately shape the future of the construction industry through collaboration and consensus.

There’s really no show quite like IFPE. It sits on the second floor of South Hall, surrounded by CONEXPO-CON/AGG, the largest construction equipment expo in the Western Hemisphere. 
But unlike its co-located trade show counterpart, IFPE brings products and technology well beyond the needs of the OEMs who manufacture the offerings seen at CONEXPO-CON/AGG. 

The products on display span all sectors of the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries. Engineers designing equipment for construction, agriculture, aerospace, automotive, – even amusement parks – come to IFPE.  

For example, the same company that may be looking for hydrostatic drives for a new loader might also be looking for hydraulic or pneumatic factory automation solutions for the manufacturing line where that loader will be built.

Part of the IFPE show experience for many attendees includes participation in IFPE’s education program, including college courses and timely sessions to help them stay on top of their game. 

IFPE Education – Focused on Fluid Power
The IFPE College Courses emphasize hands-on technical knowledge on the effective use of hydraulics in mobile equipment. Content includes Fundamentals of Hydraulic Systems; Electro Hydrostatic Actuation; Safety Hydraulics, Best Practices for Modern Machinery; Hydraulics in the Digital Age: Hydraulic Fluid Properties, Efficiency and Contamination Control; and Digital Design.

The IFPE Research Symposium is hosted by IFPE co-owner National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) and runs during lunch (11:30 am -12:30 pm) March 11-13. Sessions will showcase the latest fluid power research at U.S. universities being funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve energy efficiency of off-road vehicle hydraulic systems.

“We focused on developing education programs that offer attendees the latest ideas and innovations in fluid power technology, applications and research. Our classes and sessions deliver critical information for engineers and others involved in the design and manufacturing process,” said Eric Lanke, president/CEO, NFPA. 

IFPE 2020 education includes:
Additive Manufacturing - Vince Anewenter, Milwaukee School of Engineering
Industry of the Future - Prasad Ganorkar, McKinsey & Company
IoT – Sharing Data Across Customer Boundaries - Adam Livesay, Elevat
Mobile Hydraulic Robotics - Autonomous Machines - Chris Woodard and John O’Neill, Danfoss
Workforce Development - Lynn Beyer, NFPA

Presenters for IFPE’s education sessions come from distinguished Universities and organizations like MSOE, Purdue University, Parker Hannifin, Danfoss and many more.

New for the 2020 show is the opportunity to mix and match IFPE sessions with those offered through CONEXPO-CON/AGG, giving attendees an even greater value for their education dollar. 

To add to the great education sessions, and the over 400 exhibitors, in 2020 IFPE will be hosting - for the very first time - a special networking reception for engineers and executives - right on the show floor. 

IFPE Networking Reception
IFPE’s Fluid Power Hour, presented by Bosch Rexroth, will be held on March 11th from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on the IFPE show floor. The event includes a bonus hour on the IFPE show floor, complimentary hors ‘d oeuvres and cocktails and entertainment.

“AEM and the National Fluid Power Association are proud to bring together a unique combination of engineers and executives at IFPE 2020, both in booths and in aisles, to share ideas, educate one another, and ultimately shape the future of the construction industry through collaboration and consensus,” said John Rozum, director, ag events at AEM and IFPE show director. “There’s simply no better place for engineers to find new ideas, new people and new solutions to significant organizational challenges than a trade show floor. 

“We encourage all exhibitors to bring their top engineers and executives to take advantage of a great networking experience and interact with industry peers,” said Rozum.

Event sponsors include Comer Industries, DANA, Danfoss, Eaton, Nachi, Ha-vey, Poclain and Sun Hydraulics.

What is new and different at CONEXPO 2020? 
Let’s start with one of the most noticeable changes - the gold lot is under construction. So what will we do with the exhibitors who were once in that space? 
 
CONEXPO-CON/AGG is expanding the 2020 show footprint to include the Las Vegas Festival Grounds, located on the Las Vegas Strip adjacent to the Circus Circus Hotel.We know this will be a huge show with a lot to see and do. 

Our connected campus will include new and expanded transportation options including additional buses to help get you to/from the show, and more options to get you around the show with golf carts and pedicabs. We are also offering more food outlets and other creature comforts to help enhance the attendee experience. 

Types of exhibits in the Festival Grounds will include aerial and cranes including NCCCO’s Lift Safety Zone, earth moving, hauling and underground construction. 

Exhibitors in the Festival Grounds include brands like Caterpillar, JLG Industries, Manitou North America and Volvo Construction Equipment North America. 

It’s not enough to simply survive in the industry today. The goal should be to thrive. 

And in order to do so, industry professionals need to step outside their comfort zones, embrace an open-minded attitude toward all of the ways disruptive technologies are impacting the world today, and learn how to leverage the latest and greatest industry trends to positively impact their bottom lines. 
“It’s that third and final aspect that’s on everyone’s mind today,” said Dana Wuesthoff, vice president of exhibitions and event services and CONEXPO-CON/AGG show director. “What is the return on investment (ROI) of these trends and technologies? What can they offer to help employees do their job better? 

“A trade show like CONEXPO-CON/AGG can help answer those questions – and more. What the show serves to do is offer industry professionals a forum for seeing new trends and innovations, help them determine the value proposition, bring that information back to their organizations, and inspire them to act on what they learned,” continued Wuesthoff.  

AEM is committed to bringing people together at CONEXPO-CON/AGG, because the show serves as a catalyst for industry growth and development. It allows the association to have a hand in helping companies drive their business forward and develop a sound knowledge for what tomorrow may bring.
In addition to the 2800 exhibiting companies and the 2.6 million square feet of exhibit space there are also 180 education sessions.
Take Charge of the Future
Education at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020

Education is always a vital component of both CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE to help attendees not only survive, but thrive in a changing and global industry.

Attendees at the 2020 shows can take advantage of more than 180 education sessions packed with timely and actionable information, developed with the guidance of leading industry groups, and delivered by industry experts. 

New for 2020 are mix-and-match sessions between CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE for company teams to cost-effectively obtain learning sessions targeted to their needs.

“The line-up of programming is not only larger than it has ever been but includes a fresh line-up of speakers stacked side-by-side with core programming that is always highly attended,” said Eileen Dickson, vice president education, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association and CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education Committee chair.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education features 10 tracks covering a variety of equipment applications, site development, fleet management, business best practices, technology, safety, and attracting and retaining talent. IFPE education is grouped in two tracks: Hydraulics & Pneumatics at Work and The Business of Fluid Power. Its popular College Courses return, and new is an IFPE Research Symposium.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education – Targeting the Construction Industries

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education tracks will offer the latest trends and best practices focused on: aggregates; asphalt; concrete; cranes, rigging & aerial lifts; earthmoving & site development; equipment management & maintenance; business management; and safety, plus technology solutions and attracting, engaging and retaining talent.

“The education committee took great care in putting together a program that grows attendee knowledge on building their business on all fronts, whether the technical skills needed in the field or best practices to build their business,” said Graham Brent, CEO of the NCCCO Foundation and CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education Committee vice chair.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education includes:
Driving New Innovation at Complacent Companies - James Benham , JB Knowledge
Drones on Construction Sites for All Contractors - Ryan Murguia/Zach Pieper, Quantum Land Design
Gain a Competitive Advantage Through Construction Technology - Tauhira Hoossainy, Milwaukee Tool
How to Win the War for Talent - Gregg Schoppman, FMI
Safety Training Ninja - Regina McMichael, The Learning Factory, Inc.
Technology Trends: Lessons Learned - Helga Jacobsen, United Rentals
Top 10 Reasons Why Construction Businesses Fail - Larry Kokklenberg, Center for Business Development

These sessions feature the latest topics and industry trends and are grouped into 10 tracks for ease in finding education that meets your needs. 

One of those sessions will be “Drones on Construction Sites for All Contractors” on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG. 

From machine control to drone survey data, material takeoffs to volumetric calculations and progress reporting, site prep contractors have many ways they can incorporate new technologies into their workflow, but misconceptions are holding some contractors back. 

We spoke with Ryan Murguia, president and Zach Pieper, operations manager of Quantum Land Design, based in Sperry, Iowa, to get the facts. Quantum Land Design specializes in managing and preparing site data required for including 3D machine control, drone data and takeoffs of any scale.
Murguia and Pieper not only understand technology, but have previously worked in construction, so they know what contractors need to get done. “We help contractors figure out how each piece of the technology puzzle can fit into their operation,” says Murguia. “We can demonstrate different technology use cases they might not have considered."


Here are the five biggest misconceptions about technology for site prep contractors:

1. It’s going to be difficult and expensive to collect data from a drone.

“There’s a misconception that you need an expensive drone, someone that is highly trained, special survey equipment or a costly web service contract to process data,” says Murguia.  Instead, Murguia says that most of the equipment needed is already in place on the jobsite. The reality is that most contractors already have machine control and a GPS rover set up on the site. “If you have that equipment, it’s pretty straight forward to add a drone to help you collect topographic data.” Pieper says he can teach someone in two to four hours how to get the data they need from a drone flight.

2. Old ways of measuring earthmoving are more reliable. 

Site prep contractors are paid based on the amount of dirt moved, and historically those numbers have not been calculated, but estimated based on the truck count and the average amount in a truckload. According to Murguia, those estimates might be 20-50 percent off the actual amount of dirt moved.

Drone data is a game changer because it can capture accurate cut volumes based on millions of data points in minutes. Clients are assured of more accurate billing and costly disputes are avoided.
Murguia says an engineer working on a hydraulic dam project didn’t trust the data captured from drones, so he also used traditional surveying methods and compared them to the data from three flights. “We were within four percent of the volume numbers and they trusted our numbers based on drone data more,” said Murguia. 

3. We need large jobs to make effective use of drones and machine control.

Another misconception is that machine control only makes sense for large jobs. “You can use it just for digging a basement,” says Murguia.  In one use case Quantum Land Design used drone data to create a machine control file to address drainage issues on a new construction home site. With the expansion of machine control to excavators, the number of jobs using machine control is growing rapidly.

4. Our firm can’t afford to outsource.

While Pieper and Murguia recommend contractors capture their own data, they also believe that for most companies, it makes sense to outsource managing and manipulating the data.  “The learning curve is really in the office,” says Pieper.  Hardware and software is a big expense.  Outsourcing makes the technology accessible to small firms that may not have the resources for an estimating department or data analysis. “The immediate value comes from making sure you get paid accurately for the work completed.”

 5. I can only use drone data for measuring stockpiles.

Pieper says contractors have tendency to purchase a drone for a particular task such as measuring stockpiles, and then use it only for that one task. “There’s so much more you can do with them that is valuable,” says Pieper.  In one use case a customer saw some extraordinary results.

A quarry customer was having trouble with failing transmissions on their haul trucks.  An analysis of the quarry survey data captured by the drone revealed steeper slopes than was specified for the haul trucks.  After the haul road was redesigned to the proper specs, the company saved over $300,000 in fuel and maintenance costs in one year.  “It took just four days, from drone flight to delivering the machine control model with the new haul road, they were able to see the benefits immediately,” said Pieper. “A traditional survey, design, and construction staking process would have taken weeks, and been far more dangerous in this situation.”

If you want to learn how to tie together all the construction technologies for earthmoving into your workflow, check out the session by Murguia and Pieper. 

The Real Reason Construction Companies Fail 
Another must-see session at CONEXPO=-CON/AGG will be the Real Reason Construction Companies Fail, presented by Larry Kokklenberg, PhD. Larry is a principal in Organizational Trainers & Consultants, a dynamic consultancy serving both the public and private sectors.

According to Larry, The Small Business Administration (SBA) identifies a huge failure rate among start-up companies:
Roughly 20 percent fail in the first year
Roughly 50 percent fail within five years
Roughly 66 percent fail within 10 years

Construction companies have an even uglier track record. Roughly two-thirds go out of business within five years. The owners of those failed companies tend to point fingers at external factors such as insurance, taxes, politics, an inability to get enough workers, etc. But those factors aren’t really the cause of company failures, which is why the competitors down the street seem to be handling them just fine.

In reality, the real causes of construction company failure are within the control of the company owner. That doesn’t mean these causes are always easy to fix. It takes planning, discipline and hard work. But nonetheless, they are controllable.

In working with construction companies for many years, Larry has assembled a long list of reasons for failure. He will be getting into the fine details of all of them when he speaks at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020. Until then, here are a few of the more consequential.

1. Starting the business for the wrong reasons. 
Many companies don’t start out with a strategic business plan. The owner simply wants to be his or her own boss. Sometimes a friend says, “Let’s start our own company and make a lot of money.” The problem is that nobody gets rich quick in the construction industry. There are only two entities that are in the business of making money: the Department of Treasury and counterfeiters. Construction companies are in the business of serving customers.

Starting a construction company should be based on a legitimate opportunity, i.e. little competition in a growing market area. The owner should also have a clear vision for what he or she wants to the company to be, along with a roadmap toward profitability. Having a strategic roadmap will also help new companies avoid another common cause of failure: trying to grow and diversify too quickly.

2. Poor company culture. 
Nobody wants to go to work in a war zone. When that’s the type of culture that exists, people just put in the bare minimum. This culture often leads to higher employee turnover, sloppy work, higher workman’s comp claims, and financial losses. The unfortunate truth is that many construction companies do not have a great culture. Leadership must identify what employees want, what the company wants, and how to get there. It takes commitment and time, but it can be done.

3. Poor hiring. 

There’s a saying I like: “When you just hire a pair of hands, you never get a head.” For long-term success, companies must hire people with the desire and ability to grow with the company and help lead. Warm bodies aren’t enough. This can be harder to do when hiring out of a union hall. But even in that circumstance, it’s probably better to pay any show-up costs and ask for a more qualified employee. That’s far less costly than carrying an employee who continues to perform substandard work or has a bad attitude.

4. Poor financial systems. 

This is a big bullet point under the broader topic of capital and financial management. Many construction companies can’t track if they’re making or losing money until the very end of the year. I’ve even seen companies that fail to bill for all or their work because they are so busy completing projects and doing estimates for new projects. Good financial systems are an absolute must so those types of things do not happen. Accounting software can help, but won’t solve everything. A good accountant or in-house financial manager may be advisable —one that will provide detailed accounting at least every few months.

 5. Inefficient operations. 

Inefficiency rarely happens in big, easily identifiable chunks. Inefficiency typically impacts that company in 10- or 20-minute increments. A good example is a seven-person crew standing around on a jobsite waiting for a truck to show up. Over the course of the year, this type of wasted time can add up to the point that all profitability is sacrificed.

6. Poor customer service. 
A lot of companies do not listen to their customers very well. Companies just focus on completing the work according to the contract. If they get paid, they assume all is good. But remember, construction companies are in the business of serving customers, and that includes good customer service.

7. Family-run corporations. 
These businesses have an even higher failure rate than the typical company. Family-run businesses have a unique set of challenges that generally hurt future generations more than the current generation. This is a complex issue with many facets to consider. 

5 Ways to Shake Up Your Safety Training

Another speaker who should be on your must-see list is Regina McMichael. 

At 20-years old, Regina’s husband died after falling off a roof at a jobsite where he was working. That was the day her safety career started. Thirty-three years later she is still laser-focused on making the industry safer by improving the way we teach safety training. Her energy, humor, and engaging style as a speaker and trainer has earned her rave reviews throughout the industry. She recently shared five key ways to change your safety training to make it more effective.

1. Identify What the Learners Know and What They Need to Know

 “The gap between these two areas is what you teach to,” says McMichael. “Nothing more, nothing less.” She teaches trainers to use the ADDIE Model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) to first analyze and then design training.  “We need to respect our audience and not waste time teaching them things they don’t need to know, like the 29 CFR 19….– they don’t need to know that to be safe,” she says.

2. Make Training Interactive

It’s time to put away those deadly PowerPoint presentations. McMichael recommends engaging workers with problem-solving activities. “Give them a scenario and ask how would you fix this? It will be much more interesting and fun,” she says. “Have the workers help develop the solutions and train themselves.” Use case studies, group discussion and competition to gain their interest and attention. “Friendly competition makes classes fun and makes things stick,” she says.

3. Use Multiple Avenues to Train Workers

In construction there are a huge number of small firms without someone in a dedicated safety role. Those tasked with safety training are frequently overworked and can find themselves in a position of having to teach a topic they don’t have any expertise in.  McMichael advises firms to use multiple training tools, such as local classes, online training, in-person training, and one-on-one jobsite training with supervisors to help lessen the burden on those in the safety-training role. “There is no one magic solution,” she explains.

4. Bring Humanity Back to Safety

“If we’re going to be successful, safety training cannot be about compliance,” says McMichael. “We have to let human beings know we care about them and let them know we want them to stay alive.” Jobsite pressures can often result in workers not taking the time to be safe. Employers need to show they value workers by providing them with the knowledge and best practices to ensure they go home to their families.

5. Support Your Trainers

McMichael believes a commitment to safety and effective training will enable companies to move from compliance-driven checklists to humanity-based solutions. One of McMichael’s classes, Getting a Seat at the C-Suite: What Every Safety Pro Should Know, focuses on how to get management to support safety initiatives. Another, titled Safety Training Ninjas, based on her recently released book, “The Safety Training Ninja” equips trainers with a process to develop effective training, and tools to make it valuable and something people want to learn. Trainers also learn how to develop learning objectives and demonstrate objectives were achieved. People not Policy, is about bringing humanity back to the safety world. All three programs will be offered at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020. 

"Safety Training Ninja" will be presented on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG.

For free safety training resources and information about McMichael visit www.safetytrainingninja.com

CONEXPO-CON/AGG’s comprehensive Education Program is the leading source for contractors, business owners, construction material producers and end users to obtain cutting-edge information for today’s challenging economy and business model. The latest topics and industry trends are grouped into 10 tracks for ease in finding education that meets your needs. Learn more about 2020 education program offerings.

Disruptive trends and technology are fundamentally transforming the way business is being conducted today. 

It’s never been more important to keep an eye out for what the future may bring by attending trade shows, conferences and other educational opportunities. Because there’s truly no better way to help industry professionals navigate the present, prepare for tomorrow and – most importantly – learn how to reduce costs and drive revenue growth.

Some of the exciting innovations you will see at the show include: 
Electric Equipment
Unmanned machines
Predictive Maintenance
and Sustainability....just to name a few.  

Speaking of moving the industry forward, in 2017 we introduced the Tech Experience. An exhibit dedicated solely to presenting new construction innovations and emerging technologies that will drive change and improvement across the construction industry. 

The Tech Experience returns with two locations
A 10 by 22-foot city replica, demonstrating how a smart city, through sensors and analytics will be able to transform information into digestible data, providing knowledge for the city to work smarter. The replica will be just one of the many items on display at CONEXPO-CON/AGG in the Tech Experience and will showcase several scenarios, including; Different city grids and how a city responds to heat, wind and storms. Connectivity in the city, including 5G, sensors, telematics and IOT, and
Impacts of construction. The jobsite of the future within the city and how equipment will communicate will also be on display.

“We were beyond excited to reveal the Smart City today,” said Al Cevero, senior vice president  construction, mining & utility at the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM). “Our goal for the Tech Experience in 2020 is to show contractors how all of these exciting new technologies will impact their current work, how the expectations and demands of customers will change and how the current state of infrastructure may change.” 

In 2020 we will continue that journey to the future of the Construction Industry. The main goals of the Tech Experience are to drive awareness and adoption of new technologies and innovations, engage and attract the next generation of attendees and position the show as a thought leader. 

The Tech Experience is focusing on three key areas that will impact the future of the industry:   Modern Mobility, Sustainable Building and Smart Cities. Our plan is to show how these areas will transform the contractor’s business in the future. In Sustainable Building we have partnered with MIT to show how they are testing the infusion of carbon into concrete to offer a building as a potential battery storage.
We have also partnered with NCAT in this area to display new materials such as soy emulsions for Asphalt. As part of sustainable building, modular construction will be a heavy emphasis and with us today is another partner of the Tech Experience -  Branch Technology.  Branch consists of a diverse team of architects, programmers, mechanical engineers, mathematicians and industrial designers focused on the common goal of revolutionizing the built environment. Branch is passionate about translating the strength, beauty, and efficiency of nature into how we build. 

Also, as part of modular construction, we plan to show 3D printed housing by Oakridge National Laboratories. Yes, that is the same group that brought us the 3D printed excavator in 2017. Printing will be demonstrated daily in the Festival Grounds location. 

The second area of focus to discuss is Modern Mobility. is to show how transportation and our infrastructure will change. We have partnered with several groups including NAPA and NRMCA and a group called The Ray utilizing the I-85 corridor for testing. The Ray uses medians and shoulders to transform our highway system using bio swales, pollinators and micro farming to reduce or eliminate 37 billion gallons of gas used for mowing. Other assets to be shown will include solar roads, interchange with solar farms as well as bridges to produce wind power. 

We are also working with another partner to show off interstate based vehicle wireless energy transfer and we are hoping to provide a glimpse of flying cars, personal mobility devices and hovering motorcycles. 

That brings us to our third area, Smart City. So what is a smart city? It’s a city where sensors and analytics are able to transform information into digestible data providing knowledge to work smarter!
We have partnered with Terbine to show you how sensors are providing the tools to create a smart city. We have also partnered with members like Komatsu to show how the sensors in a smart city transform to a smart jobsite. Our plan is to show and excite attendees in each of these areas. 

The 10 foot by 22 foot city replica of a city, will showcase several scenarios at the Tech Experience in March. Different city grids  - impacts the city’s response to heat, wind and storms. It also impacts connectivity in the city – think 5G, sensors, telematics and IOT. And we have all been in a city where construction is taking place – either a building coming down, going up or being remodeled. The jobsite of the future within the city and how equipment will communicate will also be on display. 

Our goal with these examples of our changing future is to show contractors how all of these exciting new projects will impact their current business models, how the expectations and demands of customers will change and how the current state of infrastructure needs to be altered

Most important, we want our show attendees to understand how all of this technology fits into the current landscape of the industry.  So, we are working closely with exhibitors and our show vendor to enable attendees who are visiting the Tech Experience at the show to click on a technology of interest and be directed towards exhibitors who offer that technology.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE come around every three years for a can’t-miss event. No other shows bring together as many segments of the construction industries and of the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries in one place. Attendees will have up-close access to the leading manufacturers and suppliers, latest product innovations, and knowledge resources to help their businesses thrive.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG’s comprehensive Education Program is the leading source for contractors, business owners, construction material producers and end users to obtain cutting-edge information for today’s challenging economy and business model. The latest topics and industry trends are grouped into 10 tracks for ease in finding education that meets your needs. Learn more about 2020 education program offerings.

Disruptive trends and technology are fundamentally transforming the way business is being conducted today. 

It’s never been more important to keep an eye out for what the future may bring by attending trade shows, conferences and other educational opportunities. Because there’s truly no better way to help industry professionals navigate the present, prepare for tomorrow and – most importantly – learn how to reduce costs and drive revenue growth.

Some of the exciting innovations you will see at the show include: 
Electric Equipment
Unmanned machines
Predictive Maintenance
and Sustainability....just to name a few.  

Speaking of moving the industry forward, in 2017 we introduced the Tech Experience. An exhibit dedicated solely to presenting new construction innovations and emerging technologies that will drive change and improvement across the construction industry. 

The Tech Experience returns with two locations

A 10 by 22-foot city replica, demonstrating how a smart city, through sensors and analytics will be able to transform information into digestible data, providing knowledge for the city to work smarter. The replica will be just one of the many items on display at CONEXPO-CON/AGG in the Tech Experience and will showcase several scenarios, including; Different city grids and how a city responds to heat, wind and storms. Connectivity in the city, including 5G, sensors, telematics and IOT, and
Impacts of construction. The jobsite of the future within the city and how equipment will communicate will also be on display.

“We were beyond excited to reveal the Smart City today,” said Al Cevero, senior vice president  construction, mining & utility at the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM). “Our goal for the Tech Experience in 2020 is to show contractors how all of these exciting new technologies will impact their current work, how the expectations and demands of customers will change and how the current state of infrastructure may change.” 

In 2020 we will continue that journey to the future of the Construction Industry. The main goals of the Tech Experience are to drive awareness and adoption of new technologies and innovations, engage and attract the next generation of attendees and position the show as a thought leader. 

The Tech Experience is focusing on three key areas that will impact the future of the industry:   Modern Mobility, Sustainable Building and Smart Cities. Our plan is to show how these areas will transform the contractor’s business in the future. In Sustainable Building we have partnered with MIT to show how they are testing the infusion of carbon into concrete to offer a building as a potential battery storage.
We have also partnered with NCAT in this area to display new materials such as soy emulsions for Asphalt. As part of sustainable building, modular construction will be a heavy emphasis and with us today is another partner of the Tech Experience -  Branch Technology.  Branch consists of a diverse team of architects, programmers, mechanical engineers, mathematicians and industrial designers focused on the common goal of revolutionizing the built environment. Branch is passionate about translating the strength, beauty, and efficiency of nature into how we build. 

Also, as part of modular construction, we plan to show 3D printed housing by Oakridge National Laboratories. Yes, that is the same group that brought us the 3D printed excavator in 2017. Printing will be demonstrated daily in the Festival Grounds location. 

The second area of focus to discuss is Modern Mobility. is to show how transportation and our infrastructure will change. We have partnered with several groups including NAPA and NRMCA and a group called The Ray utilizing the I-85 corridor for testing. The Ray uses medians and shoulders to transform our highway system using bio swales, pollinators and micro farming to reduce or eliminate 37 billion gallons of gas used for mowing. Other assets to be shown will include solar roads, interchange with solar farms as well as bridges to produce wind power. 

We are also working with another partner to show off interstate based vehicle wireless energy transfer and we are hoping to provide a glimpse of flying cars, personal mobility devices and hovering motorcycles. 

That brings us to our third area, Smart City. So what is a smart city? It’s a city where sensors and analytics are able to transform information into digestible data providing knowledge to work smarter!
We have partnered with Terbine to show you how sensors are providing the tools to create a smart city. We have also partnered with members like Komatsu to show how the sensors in a smart city transform to a smart jobsite. Our plan is to show and excite attendees in each of these areas. 

The 10 foot by 22 foot city replica of a city, will showcase several scenarios at the Tech Experience in March. Different city grids  - impacts the city’s response to heat, wind and storms. It also impacts connectivity in the city – think 5G, sensors, telematics and IOT. And we have all been in a city where construction is taking place – either a building coming down, going up or being remodeled. The job size of the future within the city and how equipment will communicate will also be on display. 

Our goal with these examples of our changing future is to show contractors how all of these exciting new projects will impact their current business models, how the expectations and demands of customers will change and how the current state of infrastructure needs to be altered Most important, we want our show attendees to understand how all of this technology fits into the current landscape of the industry.  So, we are working closely with exhibitors and our show vendor to enable attendees who are visiting the Tech Experience at the show to click on a technology of interest and be directed towards exhibitors who offer that technology.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE come around every three years for a can’t-miss event. No other shows bring together as many segments of the construction industries and of the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries in one place. Attendees will have up-close access to the leading manufacturers and suppliers, latest product innovations, and knowledge resources to help their businesses thrive.


About CONEXPO-CON/AGG
Held every three years, CONEXPO-CON/AGG is the must-attend event for construction industry professionals. The show features the latest equipment, products, services and technologies for the construction industry, as well as industry-leading education. The next CONEXPO-CON/AGG will be held March 10-14, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. For more information on CONEXPO-CON/AGG, visit https://www.conexpoconagg.com.

About IFPE
IFPE, the International Fluid Power Exposition is the leading North American exhibition bringing together the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries. For more information on IFPE visit https://www.ifpe.com. 

About Association of Equipment Manufacturers:
AEM is the North American-based international trade group representing off-road equipment manufacturers and suppliers, with more than 1,000 companies and more than 200 product lines in the agriculture and construction-related industry sectors worldwide. The equipment manufacturing industry supports 1.3 million jobs in the U.S., and 149,000 more in Canada. Equipment manufacturers also contribute $188 billion combined to the U.S. and Canadian economies. AEM is celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2019. Learn more about AEM at https://www.aem.org. 

Related Articles